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Around the World in 80 Minutes

Around the World in 80 Minutes


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On Thursday, Chinese Student Association (CSA) hosted its second annual Around the World in 80 Minutes, a culinary showcase for the various cultural groups on campus. Right at 5PM, Taiwanese American Student Association (TASA), Asian American Student Association (AASA), Princeton Caribbean Connection (PCC), South Asian Students Association (SASA), Malaysian and Singaporean Student Association (MASA), and CSA had tables full of food and activities set up in Campus Club.

As I entered Campus Club, I was immediately greeted by CSA members selling tank tops and shot glasses, who handed me a “bingo sheet” for the event. After scoring BINGO on the sheet by completing the various activities sponsored by different student organizations, I would receive a raffle ticket for the chance to win stuffed pandas, Hi-Chew, and green tea Kit-Kat bars!

Following the flow of the crowd, I started off in the Dining Room. The table run by MASA displayed fun facts about the relationship between Malaysia and Singapore (such as their constant fight over which culture’s cuisine reigns supreme) and put on games of Capteh, in which students tried to keep a shuttlecock in the air using only their feet. Lemon, coconut and sultana biscuits were served at the table for a great appetizer.

Right next to the MASA table was PCC with Caribbean trivia. After answering their questions, I was served beef patties, saltfish balls, and pholourie from Hot on D Spot, a Trinidadian restaurant in nearby Hamilton, NJ.

Photo by Jennifer Lee

Walking through to the back of Campus Club, I spotted AASA’s table. AASA encouraged students to write statements about themselves that defied stereotypes of their personal identities on a whiteboard and take a photo. Students were then rewarded with a platter of clear shrimp dumplings from Super Star East Buffet. TASA complemented these shrimp dumplings with rice crackers from Meidong Supermarket as well as a paper lantern making station.

Photo by Jennifer Lee

Lastly, I stopped by the CSA table, which provided pork dumplings and scallion pancakes from Tiger Noodles. Along with this, dessert was served creatively in the form of a chopstick-based competition, in which students had one minute to place as many gummy bears on their plate as they could using chopsticks.

Overall, the event provided students with a satisfying, wholesome and multicultural meal as well as a great opportunity to learn about the different cultures Princeton’s campus. Next time CSA’s Around the World in 80 minutes comes to Campus Club, make sure not to miss it, and be sure to bring an open mind and an empty stomach!

The post Around the World in 80 Minutes appeared first on Spoon University.


I n this episode of Around the World in 80 Dishes, Chef Eve Felder demonstrates how to make her version of lamb khorma. This meaty, decadent dish, enriched with cream and mild spices, is typical of the Moghul cuisine of northern India𠅊 far cry from the highly spiced vegetarian dishes of southern India. The culinary differences between the two regions are due to historical factors: In the south, much of the population follows the Hindu doctrine of vegetarianism, while in the north, centuries of rule by the Muslim Mongols (called "Moghuls" in India) left a fondness for meat and an elaborate cooking style characterized by rich, velvety sauces and fragrant, rather than hot, spices.

In the West, Moghul dishes like lamb khorma are among India&aposs best known, due to the fact that many Indian restaurateurs come from the northern region of Punjab. However, in its native land, this recipe would typically be reserved for a special occasion, such as a wedding banquet. This is because of its expensive ingredients, especially the silky cashew paste that gives the sauce a perfect consistency. This refined ingredient bears witness to the dish&aposs roots in Moghul royal court cooking.

Despite its noble history, lamb khorma is not actually hard to make. The lamb is marinated and then simmered in a mixture of spices and yogurt, then the sauce is finished with cream in the last few minutes. For an authentic accompaniment, serve the lamb with a saffron-scented rice pilaf.


I n this episode of Around the World in 80 Dishes, Chef Eve Felder demonstrates how to make her version of lamb khorma. This meaty, decadent dish, enriched with cream and mild spices, is typical of the Moghul cuisine of northern India𠅊 far cry from the highly spiced vegetarian dishes of southern India. The culinary differences between the two regions are due to historical factors: In the south, much of the population follows the Hindu doctrine of vegetarianism, while in the north, centuries of rule by the Muslim Mongols (called "Moghuls" in India) left a fondness for meat and an elaborate cooking style characterized by rich, velvety sauces and fragrant, rather than hot, spices.

In the West, Moghul dishes like lamb khorma are among India&aposs best known, due to the fact that many Indian restaurateurs come from the northern region of Punjab. However, in its native land, this recipe would typically be reserved for a special occasion, such as a wedding banquet. This is because of its expensive ingredients, especially the silky cashew paste that gives the sauce a perfect consistency. This refined ingredient bears witness to the dish&aposs roots in Moghul royal court cooking.

Despite its noble history, lamb khorma is not actually hard to make. The lamb is marinated and then simmered in a mixture of spices and yogurt, then the sauce is finished with cream in the last few minutes. For an authentic accompaniment, serve the lamb with a saffron-scented rice pilaf.


I n this episode of Around the World in 80 Dishes, Chef Eve Felder demonstrates how to make her version of lamb khorma. This meaty, decadent dish, enriched with cream and mild spices, is typical of the Moghul cuisine of northern India𠅊 far cry from the highly spiced vegetarian dishes of southern India. The culinary differences between the two regions are due to historical factors: In the south, much of the population follows the Hindu doctrine of vegetarianism, while in the north, centuries of rule by the Muslim Mongols (called "Moghuls" in India) left a fondness for meat and an elaborate cooking style characterized by rich, velvety sauces and fragrant, rather than hot, spices.

In the West, Moghul dishes like lamb khorma are among India&aposs best known, due to the fact that many Indian restaurateurs come from the northern region of Punjab. However, in its native land, this recipe would typically be reserved for a special occasion, such as a wedding banquet. This is because of its expensive ingredients, especially the silky cashew paste that gives the sauce a perfect consistency. This refined ingredient bears witness to the dish&aposs roots in Moghul royal court cooking.

Despite its noble history, lamb khorma is not actually hard to make. The lamb is marinated and then simmered in a mixture of spices and yogurt, then the sauce is finished with cream in the last few minutes. For an authentic accompaniment, serve the lamb with a saffron-scented rice pilaf.


I n this episode of Around the World in 80 Dishes, Chef Eve Felder demonstrates how to make her version of lamb khorma. This meaty, decadent dish, enriched with cream and mild spices, is typical of the Moghul cuisine of northern India𠅊 far cry from the highly spiced vegetarian dishes of southern India. The culinary differences between the two regions are due to historical factors: In the south, much of the population follows the Hindu doctrine of vegetarianism, while in the north, centuries of rule by the Muslim Mongols (called "Moghuls" in India) left a fondness for meat and an elaborate cooking style characterized by rich, velvety sauces and fragrant, rather than hot, spices.

In the West, Moghul dishes like lamb khorma are among India&aposs best known, due to the fact that many Indian restaurateurs come from the northern region of Punjab. However, in its native land, this recipe would typically be reserved for a special occasion, such as a wedding banquet. This is because of its expensive ingredients, especially the silky cashew paste that gives the sauce a perfect consistency. This refined ingredient bears witness to the dish&aposs roots in Moghul royal court cooking.

Despite its noble history, lamb khorma is not actually hard to make. The lamb is marinated and then simmered in a mixture of spices and yogurt, then the sauce is finished with cream in the last few minutes. For an authentic accompaniment, serve the lamb with a saffron-scented rice pilaf.


I n this episode of Around the World in 80 Dishes, Chef Eve Felder demonstrates how to make her version of lamb khorma. This meaty, decadent dish, enriched with cream and mild spices, is typical of the Moghul cuisine of northern India𠅊 far cry from the highly spiced vegetarian dishes of southern India. The culinary differences between the two regions are due to historical factors: In the south, much of the population follows the Hindu doctrine of vegetarianism, while in the north, centuries of rule by the Muslim Mongols (called "Moghuls" in India) left a fondness for meat and an elaborate cooking style characterized by rich, velvety sauces and fragrant, rather than hot, spices.

In the West, Moghul dishes like lamb khorma are among India&aposs best known, due to the fact that many Indian restaurateurs come from the northern region of Punjab. However, in its native land, this recipe would typically be reserved for a special occasion, such as a wedding banquet. This is because of its expensive ingredients, especially the silky cashew paste that gives the sauce a perfect consistency. This refined ingredient bears witness to the dish&aposs roots in Moghul royal court cooking.

Despite its noble history, lamb khorma is not actually hard to make. The lamb is marinated and then simmered in a mixture of spices and yogurt, then the sauce is finished with cream in the last few minutes. For an authentic accompaniment, serve the lamb with a saffron-scented rice pilaf.


I n this episode of Around the World in 80 Dishes, Chef Eve Felder demonstrates how to make her version of lamb khorma. This meaty, decadent dish, enriched with cream and mild spices, is typical of the Moghul cuisine of northern India𠅊 far cry from the highly spiced vegetarian dishes of southern India. The culinary differences between the two regions are due to historical factors: In the south, much of the population follows the Hindu doctrine of vegetarianism, while in the north, centuries of rule by the Muslim Mongols (called "Moghuls" in India) left a fondness for meat and an elaborate cooking style characterized by rich, velvety sauces and fragrant, rather than hot, spices.

In the West, Moghul dishes like lamb khorma are among India&aposs best known, due to the fact that many Indian restaurateurs come from the northern region of Punjab. However, in its native land, this recipe would typically be reserved for a special occasion, such as a wedding banquet. This is because of its expensive ingredients, especially the silky cashew paste that gives the sauce a perfect consistency. This refined ingredient bears witness to the dish&aposs roots in Moghul royal court cooking.

Despite its noble history, lamb khorma is not actually hard to make. The lamb is marinated and then simmered in a mixture of spices and yogurt, then the sauce is finished with cream in the last few minutes. For an authentic accompaniment, serve the lamb with a saffron-scented rice pilaf.


I n this episode of Around the World in 80 Dishes, Chef Eve Felder demonstrates how to make her version of lamb khorma. This meaty, decadent dish, enriched with cream and mild spices, is typical of the Moghul cuisine of northern India𠅊 far cry from the highly spiced vegetarian dishes of southern India. The culinary differences between the two regions are due to historical factors: In the south, much of the population follows the Hindu doctrine of vegetarianism, while in the north, centuries of rule by the Muslim Mongols (called "Moghuls" in India) left a fondness for meat and an elaborate cooking style characterized by rich, velvety sauces and fragrant, rather than hot, spices.

In the West, Moghul dishes like lamb khorma are among India&aposs best known, due to the fact that many Indian restaurateurs come from the northern region of Punjab. However, in its native land, this recipe would typically be reserved for a special occasion, such as a wedding banquet. This is because of its expensive ingredients, especially the silky cashew paste that gives the sauce a perfect consistency. This refined ingredient bears witness to the dish&aposs roots in Moghul royal court cooking.

Despite its noble history, lamb khorma is not actually hard to make. The lamb is marinated and then simmered in a mixture of spices and yogurt, then the sauce is finished with cream in the last few minutes. For an authentic accompaniment, serve the lamb with a saffron-scented rice pilaf.


I n this episode of Around the World in 80 Dishes, Chef Eve Felder demonstrates how to make her version of lamb khorma. This meaty, decadent dish, enriched with cream and mild spices, is typical of the Moghul cuisine of northern India𠅊 far cry from the highly spiced vegetarian dishes of southern India. The culinary differences between the two regions are due to historical factors: In the south, much of the population follows the Hindu doctrine of vegetarianism, while in the north, centuries of rule by the Muslim Mongols (called "Moghuls" in India) left a fondness for meat and an elaborate cooking style characterized by rich, velvety sauces and fragrant, rather than hot, spices.

In the West, Moghul dishes like lamb khorma are among India&aposs best known, due to the fact that many Indian restaurateurs come from the northern region of Punjab. However, in its native land, this recipe would typically be reserved for a special occasion, such as a wedding banquet. This is because of its expensive ingredients, especially the silky cashew paste that gives the sauce a perfect consistency. This refined ingredient bears witness to the dish&aposs roots in Moghul royal court cooking.

Despite its noble history, lamb khorma is not actually hard to make. The lamb is marinated and then simmered in a mixture of spices and yogurt, then the sauce is finished with cream in the last few minutes. For an authentic accompaniment, serve the lamb with a saffron-scented rice pilaf.


I n this episode of Around the World in 80 Dishes, Chef Eve Felder demonstrates how to make her version of lamb khorma. This meaty, decadent dish, enriched with cream and mild spices, is typical of the Moghul cuisine of northern India𠅊 far cry from the highly spiced vegetarian dishes of southern India. The culinary differences between the two regions are due to historical factors: In the south, much of the population follows the Hindu doctrine of vegetarianism, while in the north, centuries of rule by the Muslim Mongols (called "Moghuls" in India) left a fondness for meat and an elaborate cooking style characterized by rich, velvety sauces and fragrant, rather than hot, spices.

In the West, Moghul dishes like lamb khorma are among India&aposs best known, due to the fact that many Indian restaurateurs come from the northern region of Punjab. However, in its native land, this recipe would typically be reserved for a special occasion, such as a wedding banquet. This is because of its expensive ingredients, especially the silky cashew paste that gives the sauce a perfect consistency. This refined ingredient bears witness to the dish&aposs roots in Moghul royal court cooking.

Despite its noble history, lamb khorma is not actually hard to make. The lamb is marinated and then simmered in a mixture of spices and yogurt, then the sauce is finished with cream in the last few minutes. For an authentic accompaniment, serve the lamb with a saffron-scented rice pilaf.


I n this episode of Around the World in 80 Dishes, Chef Eve Felder demonstrates how to make her version of lamb khorma. This meaty, decadent dish, enriched with cream and mild spices, is typical of the Moghul cuisine of northern India𠅊 far cry from the highly spiced vegetarian dishes of southern India. The culinary differences between the two regions are due to historical factors: In the south, much of the population follows the Hindu doctrine of vegetarianism, while in the north, centuries of rule by the Muslim Mongols (called "Moghuls" in India) left a fondness for meat and an elaborate cooking style characterized by rich, velvety sauces and fragrant, rather than hot, spices.

In the West, Moghul dishes like lamb khorma are among India&aposs best known, due to the fact that many Indian restaurateurs come from the northern region of Punjab. However, in its native land, this recipe would typically be reserved for a special occasion, such as a wedding banquet. This is because of its expensive ingredients, especially the silky cashew paste that gives the sauce a perfect consistency. This refined ingredient bears witness to the dish&aposs roots in Moghul royal court cooking.

Despite its noble history, lamb khorma is not actually hard to make. The lamb is marinated and then simmered in a mixture of spices and yogurt, then the sauce is finished with cream in the last few minutes. For an authentic accompaniment, serve the lamb with a saffron-scented rice pilaf.


Watch the video: Tegma Around The World in 80 minutes 432hz (June 2022).


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