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More 2010 French Rosés to Drink Now

More 2010 French Rosés to Drink Now

New rosés from France continue to arrive. (To read my previous notes on 2010 rosés click here.)

2010 Domaine de la Tour du Bon Rosé Bandol

Pale salmon pink in color, this wine has a gorgeous perfume with floral, herbal, and mineral nuances and hints of spice, melon, and citrus. It is elegant and has great balance with subtle, yet complex, flavors that show floral, herbal nuances with underlying tinges of pear, citrus, and mineral. The finish is long and crisp. This is an absolutely stunning rosé. — Extraordinary. $29 Kermit Lynch Wine Merchant, Berkeley, Calif.

2010 Regis Bouvier Rosé Marsannay

With a pale copper color showing a faint golden hue, this rosé of pinot noir has a lovely perfume with hints of spice, cherry, and citrus fruits. It is a lovely, elegant, fruity rosé with a nice citrus-tinged crispness on the finish. — Highly Recommended. $19.80 Kermit Lynch Wine Merchant, Berkeley, Calif.

2010 Antoine Arena Rosé Patriminio

Light golden orange in color with a golden edge, this is an unusual rosé that may very well just need a little bottle age to round out. It’s nice, but closed. With air it opened a little, which is a good sign. The wine has a faintly mineral-tinged perfume with floral, citrus, and herbal nuances. It is bright and very crisp with mineral and citrus tinges backed by a delicate fruitiness. The finish is very crisp. $36 Kermit Lynch Wine Merchant, Berkeley, Calif.

2010 Domaine de Gioielli Rosé Vin de Pays de L’Ile de Beauté

Pale salmon pink in color with a faint golden hue and a golden edge, this rosé has a gorgeous perfume showing hints of melon and peach with a floral nuance and a tinge of spice. It is rounded with a nice underlying crispness and the flavors are subtle, but complex, with spice, melon, citrus, and herbs backed by floral nuance. The wine is delicious and has a lovely citrus tinge on the finish. — Outstanding. $32 Kermit Lynch Wine Merchant, Berkeley, Calif.

Click here for 10 more favorite picks, plus food pairing recommendations.

— John Tilson, Underground Wine Letter


Compared with its red and white cousins, rosé wine still takes a preposterous amount of sass from wine snobs and noobs alike. Rosé haters are either a) sad and ignorant enough to think that "pink is for girls," or b) individuals who were exposed at a young and impressionable age to white zinfandel (a sugary, mass-produced excuse for wine that rose to power in 1970s California) or pink André (basically champagne-flavored soda). Sure, there's crappy rosé out there, but there's also crappy everything else. Skip the gallon-size jug of pink dishwater and you'll be fine.


Compared with its red and white cousins, rosé wine still takes a preposterous amount of sass from wine snobs and noobs alike. Rosé haters are either a) sad and ignorant enough to think that "pink is for girls," or b) individuals who were exposed at a young and impressionable age to white zinfandel (a sugary, mass-produced excuse for wine that rose to power in 1970s California) or pink André (basically champagne-flavored soda). Sure, there's crappy rosé out there, but there's also crappy everything else. Skip the gallon-size jug of pink dishwater and you'll be fine.


Compared with its red and white cousins, rosé wine still takes a preposterous amount of sass from wine snobs and noobs alike. Rosé haters are either a) sad and ignorant enough to think that "pink is for girls," or b) individuals who were exposed at a young and impressionable age to white zinfandel (a sugary, mass-produced excuse for wine that rose to power in 1970s California) or pink André (basically champagne-flavored soda). Sure, there's crappy rosé out there, but there's also crappy everything else. Skip the gallon-size jug of pink dishwater and you'll be fine.


Compared with its red and white cousins, rosé wine still takes a preposterous amount of sass from wine snobs and noobs alike. Rosé haters are either a) sad and ignorant enough to think that "pink is for girls," or b) individuals who were exposed at a young and impressionable age to white zinfandel (a sugary, mass-produced excuse for wine that rose to power in 1970s California) or pink André (basically champagne-flavored soda). Sure, there's crappy rosé out there, but there's also crappy everything else. Skip the gallon-size jug of pink dishwater and you'll be fine.


Compared with its red and white cousins, rosé wine still takes a preposterous amount of sass from wine snobs and noobs alike. Rosé haters are either a) sad and ignorant enough to think that "pink is for girls," or b) individuals who were exposed at a young and impressionable age to white zinfandel (a sugary, mass-produced excuse for wine that rose to power in 1970s California) or pink André (basically champagne-flavored soda). Sure, there's crappy rosé out there, but there's also crappy everything else. Skip the gallon-size jug of pink dishwater and you'll be fine.


Compared with its red and white cousins, rosé wine still takes a preposterous amount of sass from wine snobs and noobs alike. Rosé haters are either a) sad and ignorant enough to think that "pink is for girls," or b) individuals who were exposed at a young and impressionable age to white zinfandel (a sugary, mass-produced excuse for wine that rose to power in 1970s California) or pink André (basically champagne-flavored soda). Sure, there's crappy rosé out there, but there's also crappy everything else. Skip the gallon-size jug of pink dishwater and you'll be fine.


Compared with its red and white cousins, rosé wine still takes a preposterous amount of sass from wine snobs and noobs alike. Rosé haters are either a) sad and ignorant enough to think that "pink is for girls," or b) individuals who were exposed at a young and impressionable age to white zinfandel (a sugary, mass-produced excuse for wine that rose to power in 1970s California) or pink André (basically champagne-flavored soda). Sure, there's crappy rosé out there, but there's also crappy everything else. Skip the gallon-size jug of pink dishwater and you'll be fine.


Compared with its red and white cousins, rosé wine still takes a preposterous amount of sass from wine snobs and noobs alike. Rosé haters are either a) sad and ignorant enough to think that "pink is for girls," or b) individuals who were exposed at a young and impressionable age to white zinfandel (a sugary, mass-produced excuse for wine that rose to power in 1970s California) or pink André (basically champagne-flavored soda). Sure, there's crappy rosé out there, but there's also crappy everything else. Skip the gallon-size jug of pink dishwater and you'll be fine.


Compared with its red and white cousins, rosé wine still takes a preposterous amount of sass from wine snobs and noobs alike. Rosé haters are either a) sad and ignorant enough to think that "pink is for girls," or b) individuals who were exposed at a young and impressionable age to white zinfandel (a sugary, mass-produced excuse for wine that rose to power in 1970s California) or pink André (basically champagne-flavored soda). Sure, there's crappy rosé out there, but there's also crappy everything else. Skip the gallon-size jug of pink dishwater and you'll be fine.


Compared with its red and white cousins, rosé wine still takes a preposterous amount of sass from wine snobs and noobs alike. Rosé haters are either a) sad and ignorant enough to think that "pink is for girls," or b) individuals who were exposed at a young and impressionable age to white zinfandel (a sugary, mass-produced excuse for wine that rose to power in 1970s California) or pink André (basically champagne-flavored soda). Sure, there's crappy rosé out there, but there's also crappy everything else. Skip the gallon-size jug of pink dishwater and you'll be fine.