Traditional recipes

What Is Fioretto Cauliflower?

What Is Fioretto Cauliflower?

This new hybrid veggie cooks in a flash—a boon for harried holiday chefs—with familiar flavor that easily fits into traditional Thanksgiving menus.

Fioretto is a non-GMO brassica plant that is a hybrid of broccoli and cauliflower. Its tiny florets sit atop thin, pale green stems. Much more delicate than standard cauliflower, the flavor is mildly grassy and faintly sweet. The raw florets are crisp-tender and make great vehicles for creamy dips.

Eating healthy should still be delicious.

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How to Cook Fioretto Cauliflower

Sauté or stir-fry over high heat for a minute or two to add a touch of golden caramelization. Season simply with salt and pepper or a little curry powder. Or shake up your traditional broccoli casserole and use this instead.

Want even more delicious cauliflower recipes? Try these and feel free to sub in fioretto:

Fioretto is sold at some specialty grocers and online at Melissa’s ($20/3 [10-oz.] packages, melissas.com)


Roasted Fioretto Cauliflower

So many things to do with Fioretto Cauliflower, so little time. While many of you may not be too familiar with this exciting new variety, you are about to be. Fioretto, which is also known as “flowering cauliflower”, is nothing like you’ve ever seen in the produce world. Unlike regular cauliflower which produces a dense head that’s fused together, Fioretto features bright, bud-like florets on top of bright green, stick-like stems. Think of them as the more flowery, delicate version of cauliflower–a succulent and nutritious bouquet.

The flavor is a little sweeter and more tender than traditional cauliflower with a slightly nutty and grassy taste. The stem is softer which means less required time to cook. Fioretto is quite the delicacy and easy to use. This variety can be enjoyed raw, roasted, sauteed or stir-fried for a quick and easy side dish. Or for a fun kitchen project, you can try pickling them or even using in tempura. Fioretto is one of those vegetables you’re going to want to experiment with. Trust us, it’s well worth the effort!

We did a little experiment of our own with Fioretto this past week. Well, perhaps not so much an experiment since roasted cauliflower always turns out delicious. Roasting vegetables helps to bring out their deeper, nuttier flavors and this Fioretto dish was no exception. The addition of golden raisins and cashews help add extra flavor, sweetness and texture. And if you’re looking for a little more warmth and depth, adding a little curry powder is sure to amp things up in the best subtle way possible.

Roasted Fioretto Cauliflower

  • 2 packages of Fioretto Cauliflower
  • 1 package of Melissa’s Peeled and Steamed Garbanzo Beans
  • 1/3 cup of golden raisins
  • 1/3 cup of cashews
  • 1 tablespoon of curry powder (optional)
  • Olive oil

1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

2. Trim the Fioretto cauliflower into smaller florets. In a large bowl, combine the cauliflower, Peeled and Steamed Garbanzo Beans, golden raisins and cashews. Toss together evenly with olive oil.

3. Arrange everything onto a sheet pan coated with a little more olive oil or cooking spray.

4. Roast in the oven for 25 to 30 minutes until the fioretto is browned and crispy.


Healthy Food Database

From the looks of it, it could have been called Caullolini, because it look like a cauliflower version of broccolini, a hybrid of broccoli and the Chinese vegetable kai-lan.
This attractive new hybrid, has been compared to an edible bridal bouquet and is a cross between broccoli and cauliflower. It has the variety name Fioretto, which means little flower however in England the same vegetable sold in Marks & Spencer's has the very posh name "Artisan Biancoli Spears" and in Japan it's known as Karifurore or stick cauliflower. In Australian we call it Fioretto.

Fioretto was developed in Japan by the Japanese company Tokita Seed and is popular in a number of countries already. It was developed as a more popular alternative to cauliflower with less wastage. Children like it because it's stalks are more tender and sweeter than cauliflower and chefs love it because of its attractive appearance and because it's new.

How to prepare Fioretto

Like broccolini, Fioretto can be eaten raw, lightly steamed or stir fried. It cooks quickly and is best enjoyed when the stalks have some bite left in them (al dente). Once cooked the stems turn a brighter shade of green making them look very attractive on the plate.

Stored in a plastic bag in the crisper section of the fridge Fioretto will keep for up to 6 days.

Fioretto has similar nutritional properties to cauliflower and broccoli. It's an excellent source of vitamin C, potassium, vitamin K and fibre, and a good source of B6. The combined nutrients from Fioretto with a balanced healthy diet will help protect against heart disease, lower high blood pressure and cholesterol, strengthen the immune system and maintain a healthy nervous system.


Does it go by any other names?

So I did a lot of research on Caulilini and here is what I learned. Caulilini is the name given to this type of cauliflower by Mann&rsquos Food Service BUT it goes by other names around the world.

  • Karifurore
  • Stick Cauliflower
  • Fioretto
  • Flowering cauliflower
  • Biancoli
  • Loose cauliflower
  • Sweet sprouting cauliflower


TableConversation.com

There's something different about this Indian cauliflower dish.

The difference is, I've made it with tender sweet flowering cauliflower, called fioretto, instead of the usual clumpy florets.

See how light and delicate the fioretto sprigs are? 

Here's how you'll find fioretto in the market. You can saute, steam, roast, put it in salads, really anything you would do with ordinary cauliflower. 

Because I love Indian food, and Indian cooks are masters at fixing cauliflower, I turned to an Indian cookbook for a recipe.

The book was "Crack the Code" by Nandita Godbole, in which she breaks down the steps to make Indian cooking easy for anybody.

Godbole's cauliflower with peas was a winner. I adapted it slightly, using cut-up green beans instead of peas because I had those on hand and not peas. And I simplified by leaving out the potatoes she suggests but would include them next time.

The steps are to saute spices in a large wok, then add the cauliflower and peas and finally tomatoes, then decorate the finished dish with cilantro.  This is how it looks in the wok.

Godbole (above) suggests serving the cauliflower as a vegetarian main dish accompanied by bread or, for a gluten-free meal, with daal (lentils) and steamed rice.

ESSENTIAL PEAS AND CAULIFLOWER
From "Crack the Code" by Nandita Godbole

2 tablespoons oil
3/4 teaspoon cumin seeds
3/4 teaspoon black mustard seeds
1/2 cup diced yellow or white onions
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon garlic paste
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper (I used less)
3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
3/4 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 cup diced red-skinned potatoes, optional
3 cups trimmed cauliflowerets
1/4 cup peas, parboiled
Salt
1 tomato, cut into wedges
1/4 cup cilantro leaves, chopped

Heat the oil in a large wok. Add the cumin and mustard seeds and allow them to pop. Add the onions and saute until lightly golden. Add the ginger and garlic pastes and and saute until fragrant. Add the turmeric, cayenne, ground cumin and coriander Give a quick stir. If using potatoes, add them now and saute until their edges start to sear.

After this has cooked on medium-low for about 2 minutes, add the cauliflower and peas and mix until the vegetables are evenly coated with the spices. Lightly cover, allowing the steam to escape, and cook for about 10 to 12 minutes. Stir every few minutes.

When the cauliflower is tender, season it with salt and add the tomatoes. Stir and cook, uncovered, for about 3 to 5 minutes, until the tomatoes soften a little. Garnish with cilantro.

When I made this with fioretto, which is very light, it made about 4 servings. 

Comments

There's something different about this Indian cauliflower dish.

The difference is, I've made it with tender sweet flowering cauliflower, called fioretto, instead of the usual clumpy florets.

See how light and delicate the fioretto sprigs are? 

Here's how you'll find fioretto in the market. You can saute, steam, roast, put it in salads, really anything you would do with ordinary cauliflower. 

Because I love Indian food, and Indian cooks are masters at fixing cauliflower, I turned to an Indian cookbook for a recipe.

The book was "Crack the Code" by Nandita Godbole, in which she breaks down the steps to make Indian cooking easy for anybody.

Godbole's cauliflower with peas was a winner. I adapted it slightly, using cut-up green beans instead of peas because I had those on hand and not peas. And I simplified by leaving out the potatoes she suggests but would include them next time.

The steps are to saute spices in a large wok, then add the cauliflower and peas and finally tomatoes, then decorate the finished dish with cilantro.  This is how it looks in the wok.

Godbole (above) suggests serving the cauliflower as a vegetarian main dish accompanied by bread or, for a gluten-free meal, with daal (lentils) and steamed rice.

ESSENTIAL PEAS AND CAULIFLOWER
From "Crack the Code" by Nandita Godbole

2 tablespoons oil
3/4 teaspoon cumin seeds
3/4 teaspoon black mustard seeds
1/2 cup diced yellow or white onions
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1 teaspoon garlic paste
1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
1 1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper (I used less)
3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
3/4 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 cup diced red-skinned potatoes, optional
3 cups trimmed cauliflowerets
1/4 cup peas, parboiled
Salt
1 tomato, cut into wedges
1/4 cup cilantro leaves, chopped

Heat the oil in a large wok. Add the cumin and mustard seeds and allow them to pop. Add the onions and saute until lightly golden. Add the ginger and garlic pastes and and saute until fragrant. Add the turmeric, cayenne, ground cumin and coriander Give a quick stir. If using potatoes, add them now and saute until their edges start to sear.

After this has cooked on medium-low for about 2 minutes, add the cauliflower and peas and mix until the vegetables are evenly coated with the spices. Lightly cover, allowing the steam to escape, and cook for about 10 to 12 minutes. Stir every few minutes.

When the cauliflower is tender, season it with salt and add the tomatoes. Stir and cook, uncovered, for about 3 to 5 minutes, until the tomatoes soften a little. Garnish with cilantro.

When I made this with fioretto, which is very light, it made about 4 servings. 


The Fioretto Cauli Blossom: An Explainer

You might have seen it in the Woolworths supermarkets: a vivid green stalk topped with cream-coloured blossoms. Called Fioretto, it is a versatile vegetable that’s sweet and mild in flavour.

Nicola Dusi is head chef and co-owner of the Hardware Club, a 65-seat Italian trattoria housed in the heritage-listed Hardware House in Melbourne’s CBD. He says Fioretto is to cauliflower what Broccolini is to broccoli. “The flavour tends to be a lot milder.”

Fioretto, which means “little flower” in Italian, is a non-GMO hybrid brassica developed in Japan. It quickly took off in Japan, where it’s known as karifurore, its elongated stems, delicate florets and pleasant flavour appealing to Japanese chefs.

How to cook it
It’s an increasingly popular vegetable in Australia too, probably because it can be used in a few different ways. Fioretto works well in a range of dishes, and its tender stems cook quicker than the sturdier cauliflower. “You can cook it almost any way. Blanch it in hot water and have it with olive oil and salt and pepper,” Dusi says. “It also works well on the barbeque. Brush it with a little olive oil and chuck it on the grill – it chars up beautifully.”

Fioretto also works well in stir-fries and adds welcome crunch when added raw to salad. You can even pickle it like they do in Japan. “Chop it up and add it to pasta sauces,” says Dusi, who has created a pasta recipe, Puttanesca in Bianco, that pairs Fioretto with garlic, chilli, anchovies and capers.

What it pairs well with
Dusi says Fioretto’s flavour, a fraction more delicate than traditional cauliflower, also works well with seafood. “It’s great as a side dish for scallops or grilled prawns – any shellfish works really well.” Another dish devised by Dusi, a take on the traditional Piedmontese dish tonnato, pairs fioretto with tuna.

Like its predecessor, Fioretto is a perfect match for cheese of all varieties. Gently boil the Fioretto blooms in salted water for one minute before grating fresh parmesan over the top for a simple and delicious side dish. Another option is to bake the blanched Fioretto in the oven for a few minutes covered in a soft cheese like mozzarella for a quick gratin.

The more “elegant” cauliflower
One of Fioretto’s many advantages is its size. You don’t have to buy a “gigantic” cauliflower that doesn’t fit in your fridge’s already crowded crisper, says Dusi. “You can buy a pack or two and cook it all in one go.” Unlike cauliflower, which has a tough, inedible stalk, the entire vegetable can be eaten, resulting in less waste.

Fioretto, with its graceful sprouting blossoms, is much more elegant than cauliflower and its bulky “curds” – which is why Dusi prefers not to puree Fioretto. Instead, he likes to serve it whole, preserving its natural appearance. “The shape is so beautiful,” he says.

Like any passionate chef, Dusi appreciates the chance to cook with newly developed ingredients like Fioretto. “It’s exciting,” he says. “You don’t come across new ingredients very often. It’s a great opportunity to create different recipes.”

This article is produced by Broadsheet in partnership with Perfection Fresh.


Types of Cauliflower

Cauliflower belongs to the same plant species as broccoli, cabbage, kale, Brussels sprouts, and collard greens. Each of these vegetables has been selectively bred for different qualities.

Cauliflower is prized for its large, edible, curd-like head and has been consumed by humans for at least two thousand years. In that time, humans have cultivated a wide variety of different types of cauliflower.

Let us introduce you to a few of our favorites.

Alverda

The alverda cauliflower has a unique lime green color that can be intensified with direct sun exposure. The heads are medium-sized and rimmed with gorgeous deep green leaves.

Unlike white varieties that tend to be crumbly, green cauliflower like alverda have a more fibrous consistency and a sweeter flavor. These green florets pair well with spicy curries and are a treat to eat raw. You can also use them in place of broccoli in many recipes to add a slightly different texture twist to tired dishes.

Attribute Hybrid

The attribute hybrid variety of cauliflower has been around for a long time and has a look similar to the type found in most grocery stores. The large, white head grows up to 7 inches in diameter and is protected by tall, jade-colored leaves.

In the garden, this two-foot-tall cauliflower variety provides a splash of muted blue-green that attracts the eye. In the kitchen, it has a buttery flavor with slightly nutty undertones. The large head lends itself well to grilling while the more neutral-flavored curds are perfect for making cauliflower rice. Try it in our Cauliflower Rice Stuffed Peppers.

Cheddar Hybrid

With a beautiful yellow-orange head and mild flavor, cheddar hybrid cauliflower is a popular choice for consumers who don’t necessarily like the taste of traditional cauliflower. It has a medium to large head with short, light yellow-green leaves.

Cheddar hybrid has a mild, sweet taste and smooth texture. It makes a great addition to Indian dishes and other savory meals that benefit from a slightly-sweet twist. The cheddar cheese color deepens during cooking, making this variety perfect for visually livening up your dinner plate, especially for something you want to have a cheesy look, like our Cheesy Vegan Roasted Cauliflower.

Like other orange varieties, cheddar hybrid is high in beta-carotene. It is also unusually high in vitamin A compared to other types.

Depurple Hybrid

With deep lavender heads and striking white stems, depurple hybrid cauliflower provide a brilliant color splash for any meal. It has a large, 7-inch head and muted blue to green leaves.

Depurple has a noticeably delicate texture and a pleasing buttery, yet sweet flavor. The color will fade some when exposed to heat, but adding lemon juice or vinegar to the florets before cooking will help preserve that violet pizzazz.

The purple hue of this cauliflower comes from anthocyanins, a flavonoid with powerful antioxidant effects. This is the same compound that gives red wine some of its fantastic health benefits, so eat up!

Early White Hybrid

What early white hybrid cauliflower lacks in pigment, it makes up for in size and versatility. The extra-large head grows to 9 inches while the plant itself can reach an impressive 30 inches tall.

The compact head is pure white with serrated jade leaves that hug the curd throughout growth. With more of a traditional cauliflower taste, this variety is perfect for grilling, roasting, sauteing, and crumbling into rice. It also holds up surprisingly well in the freezer.

Fioretto Cauliflower

Fioretto is a true-breeding hybrid of white cauliflower and broccoli. It has long, thin, light green stems with small, yellow-white bud clusters on the ends. It goes by many names, including Chinese cauliflower and flowering cauliflower.

Strange looking as it may be, this veggie is truly a delicacy. It has a uniquely sweet yet nutty flavor and retains a crunchy texture even after cooking. It is delicious when roasted with some garlic, parmesan, or spices and the perfect addition to Chinese dishes like stir fry.

Flame Star Hybrid

The pastel-orange flame star hybrid has a similar look and characteristics to the cheddar hybrid, but with a slightly different flavor. This type has a large head but only grows to about a foot tall.

The brilliant orange color deepens when this veggie is exposed to heat. With a simple buttery, nutty flavor, the flame star performs well in a variety of dishes. Between the eye-catching color and smooth texture, this is one of our favorite cauliflower varieties to include on raw veggie trays.

Graffiti Hybrid

Graffiti hybrid cauliflower is one of the most vibrant varieties. The deep purple head can be dark lavender or slightly more plum.

The dense heads of the graffiti hybrid have a slightly sweet, mild taste. The florets retain their impressive color even when exposed to heat. We recommend steaming, sauteing, or a quick boil. For more intense cooking, try marinating in lemon juice or vinegar first to help preserve those deep hues and to retain more of the healthy anthocyanins.

Purple Cape

Another showstopper worth including in the garden and on your plate is the purple cape cauliflower. The head is a gorgeous lilac purple with a mix of light green and purple leaves snaking up the sides.

It is one of the sweetest purple varieties and has a taste more reminiscent of broccoli than its pale cousin. It is another great candidate for Indian dishes and raw veggie plates. It’s high in antioxidants, vitamin C and A, and, like all cauliflower, loaded with fiber.

Romanesco Cauliflower

Sometimes called romanesco broccoli, romanesco cauliflower has compact curds similar to the latter, green coloring similar to the former, and a spikey, geometric shape all its own. Since broccoli and cauliflower are the same species to begin with, either name is technically correct.

The whirling, spikey florets of the romanesco look like they belong on a geode, not in a salad. But don’t let the alien look throw you, this veggie has a deep earthy taste and crunchy texture. It is excellent baked with oil and spices, but can also be used in dishes to replace more common types of cauliflower.

Self-Blanching Snowball

Self-blanching snowball is an heirloom variety very similar to the original cauliflower types cultivated by early societies. It has a large to extra large head and long blue-green leaves that curl over the curds if exposed to excessive heat or cold. This plant “behavior” is known as blanching.

This variety has a flavor profile more typical of the cauliflower sold in stores. The dense florets generally take on the spices of the dish, which makes it a great choice for spicy dishes like our Crispy Cauliflower Tacos. Snowball cauliflower is great for adding texture and fiber to any savory meal.

Sicilian Violet

Another heirloom variety–this one coming from Italy–the head of the Sicilian violet it tipped with plum to lavender hues with light green stalks. It is easy to grow and forms medium heads dressed with green leaves.

This beautiful cauliflower has a mild flavor that blends well with many dishes. When cooked, however, it loses that purple flair and morphs instead into a deep green. To preserve the beauty and the antioxidant benefits, we recommend slicing the florets thin and serving them raw with some roasted beet hummus.

Snowball Y

The snowball Y cauliflower is similar to other white varieties but has a notably smaller head. The curds are tightly compact and pure white while the surrounding leaves are a vibrant green.

The snowball Y makes for a delicious addition to any dish that would typically use cauliflower. It has a nutty flavor and smooth texture that also makes it a great choice for homemade cauliflower rice.

Violet Queen

The beautiful violet queen has a deep violet color that looks almost black in the right light. Like any good queen, this cauli is tough. It can withstand temperatures as low as 14 degrees.

The deep purple hues of this cauliflower don’t fade with heat and it can be enjoyed in a variety of different ways, including grilled, sauteed, and raw. The leaves of this queen are also edible and are especially delicious cooked up with some oil, salt, and pepper.

White Corona Hybrid

Sometimes less is more, and that is certainly the idea behind the cultivation of the white corona hybrid cauliflower. The dense white heads of this variety top out at 5 inches and can be grown easily in pots.

This little cauliflower packs a lot of taste into a small package. Buttery and nutty, these florets are perfect when matched with strong dips or sauces. We especially like this variety for making cauliflower steaks–the small heads are much easier to slice and prepare.


November 12th Market Recipes ft. Fioretto Cauliflower

A big thanks to everyone who made it down to market this week! Our Corvallis and Beaverton outdoor markets will only have one more Saturday left in the season until next spring, so make sure to take advantage before winter. Being in customer service at a farmers’ market in Oregon has been heavy this past week to say the least. I hope we can all seek comfort in the bounty of our local farms, sharing good food with our friends and family. We are perennial, and even if we lose our leaves, the frost will not be fatal. Here are some cozy fall recipes to warm you up, straight from our sample station at the Corvallis Farmers’ Market.

  • Braised Fioretto Cauliflower
  • Kabocha Squash with Medusa Red Kale
  • Celeriac with Lacinato Black Kale

*Note: Any time that you find your sauté pan dry in the middle of the cooking process, add more oil! Fats get a bad rap these days, but being liberal with olive oil in a vegetable sauté probably never harmed anyone.

Braised Fioretto Cauliflower

Broccoli has a well-known cousin named broccoli raab, a non-heading variety with its own unique flavor and texture. Cauliflower turns out to have a cousin of its own called Fioretto Cauliflower Sticks. At first glance, they sort of look like broccoli raab that’s been sitting around one too many weeks, but do not be perturbed by their pale color. Today was my first day tasting these conspicuous florets, and I was surprised how delicious they were. They have a much sweeter taste than cauliflower, with a smooth, fresh texture. Though I ended up sautéing them at market, I firmly believe they are destined for the grill!

  • INGREDIENTS:
    • 2 bu. Fioretto cauliflower sticks
    • Olive oil
    • Salt
    • Chop off the very bottom of the cauliflower sticks while they’re still in a bunch. Then, slice the larger sprigs lengthwise and keep the smaller sprigs as is.
    • Heat up olive oil in your pan to medium high. Add in the cauliflower sticks, and let cook covered 2-3 minutes.
    • Remove lid, add in a pinch or two of salt, and continue to cook uncovered until tender another 2-5 minutes, depending on desired crispness.
    • Serve as is, just like asparagus!

    Kabocha Squash with Medusa Red Kale

    Kabocha and other large squashes lend themselves to easy baking, but being limited to a frying pan at market forces me to cook in creative ways. Trust me, if you stir fry kabocha once, you might never go back. Kabocha is a dry yet intensely flavorful squash, with the sweet and savory flavor similar to a roasted chestnut. Cooking it in the frying pan takes hardly ten minutes, as there is very little water to cook out, and you end up with bites of creamy squash encased within crisp edges.

    • INGREDIENTS:
      • ½ Kabocha squash, sliced thin
      • 2 large shallots, finely chopped
      • ½ head garlic (Goodfoot Farm)
      • ½ bu. Medusa red kale
      • Olive oil
      • Salt
      • Cutting up the big kabocha squash while it’s raw is the hardest part of this recipe. Be safe, take your time, and don’t chop your fingers off however tempting it may be. Follow the chopping tutorial at right, and set aside.
      • Finely chop your shallots.
      • Heat a pan of olive oil up to medium-high temp and add in the shallots, letting cook 2-4 minutes.
      • Add in the kabocha squash slices and stir around. Let cook covered 2-3 minutes.
      • Finely chop garlic and add into the pan, continuing to cook uncovered another 2-3 minutes.
      • Finely chop up ½ bunch of Medusa red kale and add it into the pan along with 2-3 pinches of salt, stirring around to distribute evenly. Let cook another 2-3 minutes until done to taste, but before the kabocha turns to mush! It’s a race against time, but it’ll always turn out delicious.

      Celeriac with Lacinato Black Kale

      I fondly refer to celeriac as “instant chicken soup,” as celery is a common ingredient in chicken soup and celeriac tastes like a savory version of celery. And let’s get real, nobody walks up to a celeriac and says, “oh boy, does that look delicious,” unless they’re being sarcastic. But if you can make it past their gnarly exterior, you will make your way to a wonderfully sweet and savory treasure.


      Recipe: Fioretto Cauli Blossom Puttanesca by Hardware Club’s Nicola Dusi

      When tasked with creating a dish using Fioretto, a sweet-tasting cousin of cauliflower, Nicola Dusi, head chef and co-owner of Italian restaurant Hardware Club, thought of one of his “all-time favourite sauces”.

      The traditional Piedmontese sauce known as tonnato – “tuna, capers, anchovies, chopped parsley mixed with a tiny bit of mayo” – is traditionally served as an entree with veal. “If you were to cook the traditional recipe, you would slowly roast some veal, cool it down and slice it thick, and serve it on a bed of tonnato sauce,” says Dusi. At Hardware Club, Dusi serves roasted brussels sprouts on a bed of tonnato. In this recipe, he has paired tonnato with fresh spiced Fioretto. In-season vegetables like Fioretto require a light touch, says Dusi. “We wanted to keep it simple.”

      The second part of the recipe is for puttanesca in bianco, a “a super quick, surprisingly flavourful pasta dish. It’s a puttanesca pasta sauce without the tomatoes,” says Dusi. “Tomatoes tend to be overpowering, and the Fioretto flavour is very delicate.”

      The good news for the time poor among us is that neither recipe requires you to sweat in the kitchen for hours. “You can knock out both recipes in the time it takes the pasta to cook,” says Dusi. “You can put on a pot of boiling water and by the time the pasta is cooked, both recipes are ready to go. It’s very quick.”

      For the pasta, “put the anchovies and capers in a pan with a bit of garlic and chilli and fry quickly”, Dusi says. “When the pasta is cooking, split the Fioretto lengthwise and cook it in the pan for a minute, because it cooks really quickly, and toss the pasta through. It’s a very simple and elegant recipe.”

      You can find all the ingredients in any supermarket “for less than $30… but feel free to upgrade to premium ingredients from your favourite local deli if you prefer”, says Dusi, whose favourite pasta – Gentile Spaghettone, “a super thick artisan pasta from southern Italy” – is available from Mediterranean Wholesale Foods on Sydney Road.

      Dusi has also made sure there are no leftover ingredients. “If you buy a jar of capers and a little tin of anchovies, you can use half for the tonnato and half for the pasta,” he says. “The recipe is designed to use up all the ingredients you’ll buy. No more half-mummified cauliflower sitting at the bottom of the veg crisper or half a jar of capers sitting in the fridge for 18 months.”

      Dusi’s advice for home cooks is to limit the Fioretto cooking time to one minute. “It seems like a short time,” he acknowledges, “but like any delicate vegetable, if you cook it too long it will taste like nothing. One to one-and-a-half minutes is enough.”

      Recipe: Sprouting spiced cauliflower with tonnato and Fioretto cauli blossom pasta puttanesca in bianco
      Serves 4
      Preparation time: 30 minutes

      Ingredients:
      3 Packs of Fioretto cauli blossom (exclusive to Woolworths stores)
      1 small bunch of parsley
      1 x 180g tin of good quality tuna
      1 x 100g jar of baby capers in brine
      1 x 50g tin of anchovies
      150g mayonnaise
      1 packet of pasta of your choice
      Fresh garlic (garlic paste in jars works just fine)
      Fresh red chillies (chilli paste in jars work just as well)
      Ground cumin and coriander seeds (optional)

      Method:
      Bring a large pot of water to the boil. Rinse Fioretto and parsley under running water.

      To make tonnato, combine the whole drained tin of tuna with half the capers, half the anchovies, a large pinch of salt and pepper, and the mayonnaise and blend with a stick blender. We like to leave the sauce chunky, but if you are more of a smooth sauce kind of person, just add a touch of water to the mixture and keep going for a little longer.

      Taste and season to your preference (a nice splash of vinegar here never hurts). This should be very tasty it should almost make you wonder if you have over-seasoned it for a second.

      Bring out one of your nice plates and lay the sauce at the bottom. Have you made too much sauce, you must be wondering? Trust me, you didn’t. The water should be boiling now, so just add some salt, drop your Fioretto in the water and cook for 1 minute. Using a slotted spoon or a spider or whatever cooking tool you normally use to avoid plunging your hands into scalding boiling water, drain the Fioretto onto a piece of paper towel and set aside.

      Drop the pasta in the same water and set the timer to cook to al dente. Gentile Spaghettone gets there in 12 minutes.

      Now, onto the pasta sauce: depending on how tasty you want your pasta to be, choose either a teaspoon or a tablespoon as your measuring tool for the ingredients. We use tablespoons – large ones.

      Take one spoon of garlic and one spoon of chilli and cook in a large splash of extra-virgin olive oil for a minute or so, until the whole kitchen starts smelling good. You want to cook the rawness out of the garlic, but don’t brown it as you will end up losing the fresh-garlic spiciness and the chilli freshness. Add the remaining capers and anchovies, a splash of the capers’ brine and cook for a minute.

      Now take 1/3 of the Fioretto and cut it into 4 or 5 chunks. Give the parsley a rough chop and add everything to the sauce.

      Drain the pasta, put it back into the pot you have cooked it in, add the garlic, chilli, anchovies, capers and Fioretto sauce (sounds delicious already), season liberally with extra virgin and keep mixing with a spoon till the pasta starch and oil emulsify to a nice pale, shiny sauce. Stir for a good couple of minutes.

      Place the remaining Fioretto cauli on the tonnato sauce. You can toss it with a little cumin and coriander powder if you wish. Serve right before the pasta if you want it to be your entree, or alongside it.

      If you have any Parmigiano Reggiano, pecorino romano or Grana Padano you can season everything on the table today with it.

      If you can manage to find a nice bottle of savarro and chuck it in an ice bucket for 10 to 15 minutes before your start eating, you will have a pretty good time.

      This article is produced by Broadsheet in partnership with Perfection Fresh.


      Vegetarian Fioretto Nachos

      Are you ready for the madness? March Madness, that is! The next couple of weeks are sure to be intense as college basketball rivalries are hashed out on the courts. Getting into the spirit of the competition means parties and gatherings best done with friends, family and food. March Madness may just be the best excuse to reconnect with old college comrades to cheer on your alma mater while feasting on game day foods. After all, a good game always deserves good food. If you are unable to make it to any of the actual games, you’ll know eating your own party bites are the next best thing.

      One recipe we’ve been going mad over are these vegetarian Fioretto nachos. Nachos are always a mouthwatering crowdpleaser but these ones are a slam dunk! Taking care of that nacho fix has never been easier with this fantastic sheet pan version. And because Fioretto is both delicious and filling, you just may find yourself swapping out most of the tortilla chips for its florets instead. A healthy win-win for all!

      Fioretto is the produce world’s newest and hottest vegetable to hit the shelves at grocery stores. Also known as “flowering cauliflower”, you can think of it as a cross between cauliflower and broccolini. Its flavor is a little sweeter and more tender than the traditional variety with a slightly nutty and grassy taste. The stems are also softer which means it’s totally edible and requires less time to cook.

      Vegetarian Fioretto Nachos

      • Tortilla chips
      • 2 packages of Fioretto, trimmed into smaller florets
      • 2 organic avocados, diced
      • 1 organic red bell pepper, sliced
      • 1 organic orange bell pepper, sliced
      • 1 organic yellow bell pepper, sliced
      • 1 jalapeno, sliced
      • 1 teaspoon of of taco seasoning
      • 1 cup of Cheddar cheese
      • Cilantro, chopped
      • Sour cream
      • Olive oil

      1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Lightly spray or drizzle some oil onto a baking sheet.

      2. Toss the Fioretto florets and sliced bell peppers with the taco seasoning and bit of olive oil, making sure the vegetables are evenly coated.

      3. Arrange the vegetables onto a baking sheet and roast in the oven for around 25 to 30 minutes until browned and crispy. Then remove from the heat and set aside.

      4. On another oiled baking sheet, spread the tortilla chips onto one layer. Top with the cheese.

      5. With the oven still on at 400 degrees, bake the tortilla chips for 6 to 8 minutes until the cheese has melted and become bubbly.

      6. Remove from the heat and top with avocados and cilantro. Spoon dollops of sour cream throughout the nachos. Serve immediately.


      Watch the video: 21. Thịt bò xào bông cải!! Stir Fried Beef and Fioretto Cauliflower!! (January 2022).